greenery

The Green Curtain

green curtain

The green curtain. Photo: ©nini,tjader.2017

I’ve written about this before, I know. That is, how I stopped using curtains in the kitchen and opted for a green curtain of plants instead. This green curtain has changed over time though so I thought I’d show some recent pictures of how my windows presently look in the kitchen. They will soon change again when some of the plants that are outside on the patio move indoors when the season changes to autumn. It is still summer-like outside, but we have already had some really cold nights. So, soon enough, plants will be moving indoors.

green curtain

The green curtain. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The name of the plant above is rhipsalis, a cactus-relative. More about it here.

green curtain

The green curtain. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The good about it is that it sifts the light through it and does’t make the kitchen dark. It hangs on the curtain rod above the south-facing window in the kitchen together with another green plant.

greeen curtain

The green curtain. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2017

I don’t think the green one to the right (with white stripes on the leaves) is a tradescantia, even though it is somewhat similar to them. Its “flowers” look more like the ones on pepperomia plants. I have no idea which one it is though. The pepperomia family is large.

green curtain

The green curtain. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2017

Above the two windows in the kitchen a large, and by now quite old, philodendron hangs on the curtain rods and follows the upper part of the window along the ceiling. I have had that one for years already in my previous flat. I know I cut it down a couple of times in my previous flat when I thought it got too tall (long). It had a period this spring and summer getting yellow leaves which fell off, but we are now past that period. It grows new stems again. And new leaves. I probably ought to fill in some fresh soil into the pot it grows in. Otherwise it doesn’t ask for much maintenance. As long as it gets watered it is happy.

green curtain philiodendron

The green curtain, philodendron. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

green curtain

The green curtain, philodendron. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

green curtain

The green curtains, philodendron. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2017

I have no idea where to lead it when it reaches the end of the second, west-facing, window. It will soon do that……

green curtain

The green curtain. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2017

In the corner between the two windows I have a plantstand (from IKEA) which presently houses one of my two stephanotis floribunda (doftranka in Swedish). I got them from a neighbour that moved north in June 2015. This one is soon up to the ceiling as well. It has grown a lot since I replanted it in a new, larger pot, with fresh soil this summer. The other one stands in the livingroom. 

green curtain

The green curtain. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Above it hangs a “wandering jew”, a tradescantia. I have re-started that one several times since I got it as it periodically gets a bit ugly and looses all its leaves at the end that grows in the soil and only keeps the ones on its tops. I then cut the tops off and put them in new soil and -re-start it. Works really well.

green curtain

The green curtain. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

To the right of the tradescantia hangs two of Ikeas hanging planters, one attached to the other, with in total six (6) spider plants.

green curtain

The green curtain. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

They presently bloom and have lots of spider plant “babies” hanging down from them.

green curtain

The green curtain. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

These “babies” are actually ready to plant, but neither I, nor my neighbour, nor other friends, need any more of them.

green curtain

The green curtain. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Its flowers are small and white. Rather nice actually. I’ll keep the “babies” and its flower hanging there for a while yet, as long as they look fresh, but in the end, I will probably cut them all off. There will be more of them again.

green curtain

The green curtain. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

My white orchid is blooming again. On a stem that dried out to half its length and then suddenly shot out a new stem. It is not that long ago since its previous blooming. On the windowsill behind it you can see a cutting from the philodendron. I took that off some time in the spring for someone who wanted a cutting. But it turned out to be too complicated to deliver it, so it still stands there on my window-sill. It took for ever for it to get roots, but now it has and its growing.

What I have on the window-sills presently isn’t all that interesting and it will change soon when I bring in some of the plants from outside. I have my six (6) orchids – which I presently test growing in water only – there and some other smaller plants.

Who needs curtains when you have plants? I have blinds though in case I want to hide from the world outside. I almost never use them.

green curtain

The green curtain. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

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Posted by nini in decoration, greenery, House plants, kitchen, Plants, Urban Jungle Bloggers, 0 comments

Summer flowers

summerflowers

Summer flowers. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

There are plenty of summer flowers in our garden. They come and go over the summer season. Some come in early spring, early summer, or in the middle of the summer or, like now towards the late summer. In most cases I let them run wild and grow where they like to grow. Except for those planted in the flower beds, but those are not covered here. Some are planted from seeds over the years. Others the birds have brought, like the smaller red and orange poppies and the digitalis. Yet others have spread by themselves over time.

I love the summer flowers. They bring color to the garden. I have plenty of different flowers and I think they now follow each other in time for blooming in a good way. It has taken a couple of years to get to that. The bumble-bees and the bees love our garden and there is no shortage of either.

This has been a rather odd summer as it has been extremely dry. In many parts of Sweden watering the garden has been forbidden for that reason. Not in my area though we have been asked to use watering in the garden sparingly. That is clearly seen on the lawns which are more brown than green. Watering the lawns has not been prio number one. Watering the flowers and shrubs and so has been more important. The dry conditions have also caused some of the flowers to bloom earlier than usual, and some later than usual. Some have become taller than usual and others smaller than usual. All have had shorter blooming seasons than previous years.

summer flowers

Summer flowers in the garden. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Below is a gallery of some of the summer flowers in no particular order.
A rather wild garden… Enjoy.

Reload page to see them in a different order. Dubbel-click an image to see a larger version. All pictures are ©nini.tjader.2017 and shot by me.

 

Posted by nini in Flowers, Garden, Garden and Nature, greenery, Nature, 0 comments

All about the garden and greenery

garden

Garden and greenery. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

It is all about the garden and greenery this time of the year. The garden is where I spend as much time as possible. I need the light, the sun and the fresh air. I can be inside when it gets cold and dark again. Now is for the outdoor life.

dry

Dry. Photo:©nini.tjader.2017

It has been an unusually dry summer though and the greenery is suffering. What is supposed to be green isn’t really.

garden

A corner of the garden. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2017

Our small piece of lawn is far from green. The grass is so dry you can hear it brake when you walk on it. I don’t water the lawn. That is a waste of water when there is a water shortage as it is this year. In many parts of Sweden it is totally forbidden to water the garden. Not here though, but saving the water is a recommendation. I do water the shrubs and the flowers and such. I don’t want them to die.

garden, greenery

To the backgarden 2017-07-02. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

In parts of the garden you get the illusion though that it is all green and lush.  It is just that, an illusion.

garden, greenery

A part of the garden 2017-07-14. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

This is the view of the garden from my south-facing window. The high plants in what I call the wild flowerbed are green. But this dry weather is affecting even those plants. They are taller than ever and their flowering-time is shorter than ever. The flowers are done flowering in a very much shorter time than they use to. But there are flowers because I water this area.

garden, greenery

A corner of the garden, 2017-07-08. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Above is the view out over the garden on July 8th. The flowers in this flowerbed were all pink at that time. They are finished now. The green bushes are black currants. We picked them shortly after I shot this picture. We actually had more black currants than ever before this year, and they were also larger. The neighbour and I got 1.5 liters of berries each. Probably because these bushes get watered regularly.

garden, greenery

A corner of the garden greenery. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Just around the corner outside my kitchen windows it looked like this at the same time.

garden, greenery

Overview of the garden 2017-07-07. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Above how it looks from the parking into the garden. Since we have finished the rhubarb (which was better this year than the last, but not really good). Considering the unusually dry summer, it is as green as it can be.

In the backgarden, behind my patio, the rose-bushes bloom as never before to the delight of the bumble-bees. We thought of digging them all up in favour of planting something more useful and edible, but maybe not… ? At least the bumble-bees love them and they are beautiful when they bloom.

beachrose

Beach rose. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

These roses are terribly invasive and spread via its roots. That’s why they should be taken away and dug up – which is hard work and a lot of digging. Most of our garden (mine and my neighbour) were covered with these roses some years back. The entire corner between our flats actually. And all the way around and past and behind my patio too. We have done a lot of digging to get rid of them. What is in the backgarden is what remains. Every spring I cut them down to about 20 cm in height. This is how much they grow in one summer. And it has so far been a very dry summer. Without getting any extra water, they still survive… It adds greenery to the garden… but…

beachroses, roses, backgarden

Beach roses in the backgarden, 2017-07-25. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Posted by nini in Garden, greenery, Outside, 0 comments

The “secret” garden 2017

garden

The garden seen from the lawn by the parking. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Our “secret” garden

In June 2015 I wrote a post in my Swedish blog about the “secret” garden, as it was then. Now it is time for a follow-up about how it looks today.

I take a lot of pictures of the garden and what is growing there, both with the purpose of publishing on the this blog and my blog in Swedish, and for Instagram and FaceBook. I also do it for myself to keep track of what is growing there and how it develops over time. It is fun to compare over the years and to see what works and what not.

garden

The garden seen from the parking outside. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

I call it the “secret” garden as it is a bit hidden away behind the noice-reducing fence. Also, you don’t see it until you go to the end of the parking outside it and look in around the corner. So not many are aware of this garden, hence the “secret” garden.

garden

The garden 2017-07-02. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The garden is a co-work with my neighbour as we share the corner between our flats. We both live on the ground-floor. My patio and my kitchen-windows are straight ahead. The window to the right are of my neighbours bedroom. The housing cooperative doesn’t do any work in our garden-area. We take care of it ourselves. Except the lawn-area beside the parking.

garden

The garden seen from the parking. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The black bucket with the peas, salad and parsley in the picture above has been moved from there since I shot the picture. Instead a spirea bush has been moved to that spot.

garden

The way into the backgarden. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Personally I also have access to the backgarden behind my patio and the noice-reducing fence, an area that it is impossible to reach without passing my patio.

garden

The backgarden, the “end” of the garden. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The neighbours on that side can only reach this area outside their windows if they climb out through their windows. The end of the backgarden is filled with thorny rosebushes. We have planned for a long time to remove them and plant something better there… I removed that maple-tree in the picture below just yesterday. But it will probably reappear… It always does.

garden

The end of the garden, 2017-07-03. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The fence was really stupidly built. We hade big problems a couple of years back when the walls of the house were re-painted. The painters had to carry one item at the time to that part of the house. I objected at the stupidity to build the fence like that already before it was built, but … decisions were already made and they were unwilling to re-think. They might have to re-think one day as it is impossible to get around the house as it is.

garden

The garden corner in 2015. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2015

Much has happened in the garden since our mirabelle-tree was taken down, soon two years ago in October. This is the second summer without the tree. It changed the garden. In hindsight the removal of the tree was to the good even though we then were upset about losing our tree (and its fruit). We’ve got another kind of greenery in the garden without the tree competing for water and light and it has become much lighter as well.

This is how the garden looks today. Click on an image to see a larger version, re-load the page to make the gallery resort images in another order. Hover over an image to see an explanation.

Posted by nini in Garden, Garden and Nature, greenery, 0 comments

Hail and thunder

Hail ongoing. Video filmed with my iPhone 7 from the door to the patio.

 

Yesterday at around 15:00 hrs there was mighty thunder – I actually jumped as it was so sudden – and then the skies opened. At first with rain, then came the hail, combined with rain……

Hail isn’t all that uncommon here at this time of the year but it was long since last time. It is fascinating. At the same time I worried for the greenery and flowers. There was a lot of hail.

The worst affected were the daylilies. There the leaves nearest to the house were broken. I didn’t remember that heavy rains and hail come down just on top of the daylilies from the roof. Now I was reminded. The hail remained on the ground around it for a couple of hours. Fortunately the hail didn’t take the budding flowers of the daylilies on their way up, only its leaves. Had they been up they would have been damaged. The greenery looked a bit sad for a while, but most of it was unharmed when I checked and shot the pictures.

hail, daylilies

Daylilies after the hail. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

I wonder how the summer-flowers and summer-plants were affected by the cold hail as it stayed for quite some time after it had stopped coming down. I was especially worried about the tomatoes, salads and herbs. They looked OK when I checked after the hail had stopped, and I hope they will continue to be OK. Outside temperature sank quite a bit with the hail.

Later in the evening it rained. The rain was OK and needed. This is a very dry season this year.

Here are some more pictures. Hover over an image to see text. Click on a picture to see a larger version. Reload page to make the images sort in a different order.

Posted by nini in Flowers, Garden, Garden and Nature, greenery, Outside, Plants, 0 comments

The Green Wall

greenwall

The Green Wall Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The green wall is up.
Now is the season where all the greens take on the same color. The green wall will still get somewhat deeper green.
The trees across the road (with a small stream at its feet) become impenetrable and hide what is behind them.
Though I know there is a daycare home behind them and plenty of large villas. Those I only see during winter when the leaves have fallen off the trees. This time of the year until autumn it is a green wall of leaves.

In a British TV-show I watch on and off, Escape to the Country, about people seeking new homes in the country-side, people often refuse homes near to the woods or lots of trees. As if they are afraid of the trees… Odd.

I love this green wall. This is where all the birds come from that eat at my feeder. This is also where the frogs, toads, snakes, rats, mice, hedgehogs and squirrels come from.

clover

Clover. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

I also have a green carpet of clover. In lack of good grass there is the clover. When it gets too high I move that too, together with the grass. This year with the very dry spring the grass is not really green and it grows slowly. But the clover grows and spread.

clover, fyrklöver

Clover for luck. Photp: ©nini.tjader.2017

If you look closely into the clover you will find your lucky clover with 4 leaves. Above there are four stems with four leaves and one with five. Most clover have just three leaves.

Talking about greenery… Recently I found a hazelnut with roots in one of the flowerbeds. And two small leaves on it. First placed it in a glass of water. Then planted it in a small flower-pot. It stands on the table on the patio. And it grows. Should I plant it somewhere and get a hazel bush? Can it survive indoors as a house-plant? It was planted by the birds.

ladybug, honeysuckle

Ladybug on honeysuckle. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Not only the greenery attacks presently. So does the bugs and the lice… It keeps the ladybugs busy and happy. Looks disgusting, but it doesn’t really harm the plants.

And the green or black lice… The green lice are on the rosebush, the black on the digitalis and the hollyhocks and the elder bushes. I’ll spare you pictures of those…

climbinghortensia

Climbing hydrangea. Also a green wall. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2017

The climbing hydrangea on the backside of the plank of the patio now covers almost the entire plank creating a green wall there. After five (5) years, it now blooms for the first time ever. Three flowers… Could have been four, but one froze one of those very cold days/nights in May.

climbinghortensiaflower

Flower on the climbing hydrangea. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

I wish there will be more flowers next year. It is nevertheless a green wall, which was the intention when planting these two hydrangea plants. Nothing else likes this location. Too shady, facing north.

Everything grows presently (provided it gets water) and gets larger and larger for each day. And it grows fast. Our garden might be wild and look slightly overgrown, but that is the look I like.

digitalis, hollyhocks

Digitalis and hollyhocks. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

 

Posted by nini in colors, Garden and Nature, greenery, 0 comments

New flowerbed

flowerbeds

New flowerbed has been added along the fence, June 2017. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

New flowerbed has been created.

Late last year we created two new flowerbeds along the fence, That turned out well. Already then we thought we might create a third flowerbed, as there were enough space for it and it looks nice with plants along the fence. Just looking at the fence isn’t all that exciting. Both I and my neighbour can see those flowerbeds from our flats. So last week I started digging.

flowerbed

Digging for new flowerbed. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2017

The worst with digging for a new flowerbed is to get the grass off. That is hard work.

flowerbed

New flowerbed. Digging done. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Next step was to create a border around the new flowerbed and to add fresh nourishment and earth.

flowerbed

New flowerbed. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

To create the border around the flowerbed was no problem as we had collected quite a lot of nice round stones for this purpose not that long ago. We had to go buy fresh earth though. Nourishment (earth with cow-dung) we had half a sack so that was added first. Then the fresh soil. And then plants.

flowerbeds

Plants to be moved. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The next step was to decide which plants to have in the new flowerbed. Two of our alumroots/heuchera had long begged to be moved to a place where they would get more space to grow. They com ein a lot of colors and we have four of them in different colors. Two of them had so far grown just to the right of the lambsears (above). So those two I dug up and moved to the new flowerbed. You see the green one at the back and a purple green one at the front in the picture above. Now the lamb’s ears can spread even more…

flowerbed

The heuchera gone from the flowerbed. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

It looks perfectly normal without the heuchera here in this flowerbed.

flowerbed

Heuchera before it was moved. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The above purple alumroot/heuchera also needed to be moved as it was slowly disappearing under the hosta at its side. so I dug that up as well.

flowerbed

Alumroot removed from the flowerbed. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

After the third heuchera was dug up I added some stones at the backside of the flowerbed and some sticks in it as there are plenty of bulbs for springflowers in the ground and I don’t want the cats to dig them up. I also dug up some of the anemone sylvestris that had spread to that same area and moved them as well to the new flowerbed. I also dug up some Japanese anemones (anemone hupehensis) that had disappeared under the largest hosta outside the patio where it would get no light.

flowerbed

The new flowerbed. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

When the planting was done and watering too it looked like in the picture above. The sad plants top the left are  the Japanese anemones. There is space left top the right of them as they have a tendency to spread out if they like the place where they grow. They didn’t like being moved though and leaves immediately wilted. 

flowerbed

The new flowerb3e3d 2017-06-14. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

One of the alumroots also hung at first after being replanted. It has recovered since though and today looks just as fine as the other two alumroots. The Japanese anemones look very sad though but I think they are still alive. Keeping an eye on them… I will have to cut off the leaves I think, but I will wait a few more days before I do. It might help them recover though.

Three flowerbeds along the fence.

So, now there are three flowerbeds along the fence. Much nicer to look at than just the fence and the grass. The two we created last year are coming along just fine and looks like in the pictures below. All plants in them have been moved from the long flowerbed along the wall of the house, which got too crowded over the years.

flowerbed

One of the flowerbeds along the fence. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

This one (called number two…) got some new plants this spring, to the left of the left astilbe.

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Flowerbed number two. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

I added two ajuga reptans (with nice blue flowers) that creeps along the earth and spreads. Have to keep an eye on those so they don’t take over the entire flowerbed. If it grows too much, I’ll move some of it to another location. I also added two other plants with yellow flowers which are low and can stand dry and poor circumstance. They have flowers now, but not the entire season.

flowerbed

Flowerbed number one along the fence. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

In flowerbed number one (closest to my flat) the plants are coming along fine as well. They have grown a lot the last couple of days and have changed quite a lot since I shot this picture. The three green plants at the upper right will become quite tall later in the season. They just now started growing.

Otherwise… everything is growing with an amazing speed and all is green and lush. I love this season. Summer is here.

summergarden

Summergarde, 2017-06-17. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2017

 

 

 

Posted by nini in Flowers, Garden, Garden and Nature, greenery, Outside, outside place, 0 comments

It is all green now

tablecloth, green, kitchentable

All green new table cloth on the kitchentable. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

It is all green now. The kitchentable got a new tablecloth. Not the green I would have wanted, but this is the one I found.

green, kitchen, kitchentable

Green in the kitchen. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

I also exchanged the chair-pillows for the green ones. Both the tablecloth and the chair-pillows go well with the carpet in the kitchen that also have green stripes (not seen in the picture).

tomatoes

Tomatoes in the kitchen, 2017-05-11. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The tomatoes are still there. All green, waiting for larger pots, warmer weather, sunshine… The other seedlings I had have either died (most of them) or been put outside (and died there). Next year there will be NO seedlings… (yes, I’ve said that before).

frozen, garden

Frozen garden 2017-05-11. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

It is an extremely cold spring where arctic weather has slipped down over us causing both cold days and ice-cold nights. It has been several mornings now that we wake up to frost and several days where it actually snowed in May… Every time worrying that what grows have taken a hit from the cold. The birds are really hungry as there are too few insects because of the cold weather.

But it is all green outside and I moved the grass yesterday… The weather is supposed to turn this weekend. The arctic winds are supposed to be gone now…

The pelargonias really want to go outside now… They are only outside a few hours daytime if temperature permit. If temperature is below zero they will freeze and die. I really hate having them on the floor in the livingroom to protect them. Patience…

pelargonias

Pelargonias on the livingroomfloor. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Posted by nini in Furniture and Decoration, Garden, Garden and Nature, greenery, 0 comments

New Beginnings

 

figtree, new beginnings

New beginnings with new stems and leaves on my figtree. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

“New Beginnings” is this months theme for the Urban Jungle Bloggers . Just the right theme for this time of the year when talking about the plantworld.

figtree, new beginnings

Part of my figtree. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

At the end of March I decided I had to cut my figtree. Something I have never done before and have no experience with. I decided to cut at least one of the stems that grew straight out and made the plant larger than I wanted it to be. So I cut off that branch and dived it into two pieces after consulting the internet and some plantgroups on FaceBook.

One part of the cut off branch had no leaves and was put directly into soil in a pot with a plastic bag around it. I kept notice of what was up and down of that bit of stem before planting it. It just took a couple of weeks until it produced a small green thing on the stem. I hope that will be a new beginning for that piece of figtree…

figtree, new beginnings

Figtree cutting. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The top part of the cutting I put in a decorative vase with water. All leaves except one soon fell off, but on the cut branch in the water small white growth appeared pretty fast.

figtree, new beginnings

Part of my figtree. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

I hope those small, white things that appear on the cutting in the water are new roots?

With a bit of luck I will get two brand new figtrees after cutting off that branch.

figtree, new beginnings

New branches on the figtree. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The new branches and leaves are growing just fine (and fast) on the tree itself.

My figtree is, against all rules, kept indoors over winter, in regular house warmth. I give it extra light by a special plant-lamp. It loses some leaves over winter, but not all. When the branch got cut, it immediately produced two figs… If it is anything like the last time it did that, it will take a couple of months to get ripe and will be almost inedible.

figtree, figs, new beginnings

Figs on my figtree. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Also one of my old cactuses is showing new beginnings. (Reload page to get images to sort in another order, click an image to see a larger version).

Apart form those two new beginnings I am again, against better knowledge, sowing all kinds of seeds. I am usually not very successful in that, but I keep on trying. Those are for outdoor plants though and will be covered in another post later on. Those are tomatoes and some flowers.

geranium, whitegeranium, new beginnings

White geranium, cut down. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

I cut down my white geranium to get more plants and to give the old one a new beginning. This is the only one I kept indoors over winter as I simply didn’t have space to keep more of them. This kind answers well to get cut down and made more plants from and did so this year as well.

geraniums, pelargonia, whitegeranium, new beginnings

New beginnings of the white geraniums. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

One of the small cuttings died since I shot this picture, but I will get at least three new white geraniums. These new beginnings will all get their own larger pots when they get big enough and I am sure that they will survive. They live outdoors on the patio over the summer.

geranium, fragranced geranium, new beginnings

Fragranced geranium. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The above is a fragranced geranium that also is a cutting from last years geraniums. It was two from the beginning, one died. This second one is growing though. The cutting started off in a glass of water where it got lots of roots. Only some time in January did I move them and put them into soil. Then its twin died, but this one survived. It needs more light to grow better. This spring has been poor of light and warmth, but hopefully that changes soon.

ginkgobiloba

Ginkgo Biloba Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

If the Ginkgo Biloba will get any new beginnings is doubtful though… Since I shot this picture two more leaves have fallen off and it is down to one rather withered leaf. I cannot yet see if the plant is dead or alive.

My oldest and largest aloe vera is very much alive though with lots of babies. Need to remove those, but waiting for warmer weather so I can take it outdoors. It is hard to handle it indoors as it is so big and heavy.

aloevera, new beginnings

Aloe Vera with babies. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

(And then there are the tomatoes…)

plants, houseplants, new beginnings

New beginnings. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Posted by nini in greenery, House plants, Plants, Urban Jungle Bloggers, 2 comments

Orchid phaleanopsis – it is orchid time

orchid phaleanopsis

Orchid Phaleanopsis. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Orchid phaleanopsis, the most common orchid in most homes. It is now orchid time. All my six orchid phaleanopis are either blooming or on their way to start blooming. They all bloom about twice a year. They live in the area of my kitchen windows, one south facing, one west facing.

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Phaleanopsis orchid Photo:©nini.tjader.2017

Three of my orchids were replanted, roots trimmed, bark exchanged and leca added recently. Three still need to be taken care of, even though they have meanwhile started to bloom. The above orchid is my oldest, the very first I got years ago. It blooms about twice a year every year.

orchid phaleanopsis

Orchid phalleanopsis. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

My orchids have been around for quite some time. The three I replanted recently I set in glass vases without a hole in the bottom. Leca balls at the bottom, som bark in between the plentiful roots. They get water very seldom and those three I have replanted I check carefully after watering so the water is not drowning them.

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Orchid phaleanopsis Photo:©nini.tjader.2017

Phaleanopsis orchids are really easy to care for and very seldom need watering. Mine get water only about every second week or so.

orchid phaleanopsis

Orchid phaleanopsis Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

To know if an orchid need water, just check its leafs. If they are solid and shiny, it doesn’t need water at that stage. Don’t give it more water then. If leafs feel soft somehow, it needs water.

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Orchid phaleanopis flower bud. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

You can also shower them regularly, on leafs and flowers and flower buds. They love that. They take in a lot of what they need of humidity from the air around it. The drier their surroundings, the more they need to be showered now and then.

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Orchid phaleanopis buds. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The above orchid is my newest (just a couple of years) one. It will get yellow flowers. This year it has two stems for the first time. Those yellow flowers use to stand for a couple of months every time it blooms.

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Yellow orchid phaleanopis Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

The yellow one is one of the three I recently replanted. It has a dying leaf that looks a bit boring. But, dying leafs should never be removed until they have dried away completely and are easy to remove. Let the nourishing from it go back into the plant before you remove that ugly leaf.

orchid phaleanopsis

Orchid phaleanopsis Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

You can also check the health of an orchid by looking at is roots. Are they thick and green (or sometimes white-ish depending on how much light they have got) the plant is fine. Are shrivelled and dry and brown? Plant may still be fine, but  those roots can be removed/cut off as they have no purpose any more.

orchid phaleanopsis

Orchid phaleanopsis. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Watch out for its leafs if it stands close to a window. The leafs can get burn-damage both from cold windows and too much sun and hot windows. It is fairly common and looks like a large dry spot on the leaf. It won’t harm the plant, but it doesn’t look nice. Windows can get really cold in the winter and really hot in the summer. Move those plants so they do not touch the windows.

orchid phaleanopsis

Orchid phaleanopsis Photo:©nini.tjader.2017

I have always been fascinated by the orchids flowers. Take a close look at them. Sometimes they look butterflies, sometimes their insides looks like small leopards are residing inside the flower.

orchid phaleanopsis

Orchid phaleanopsis Photo. ©nini.tjader.2017

My orchids do not use sticks to hold them up. That is not how they grow in the wild. They hang.

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Orchid phaleanopsis Photo:©nini.tjader.2017

I use one of Ikeas hanging planters for the three orchids that haven’t been re-planted yet. I will probably not be able to use that after they’ve been re-planted.

orchid phaleanopsis

Orchid phaleanopsis Photo:©nini.tjader.2017

When the flowers are done and finished you end up with an empty flowerstem. It might be tempting to cut that off. Do NOT do that. Keep it as long as it is alive. You might get new flowers on it at a later stager. If the flowerstem dries and dies, then you can cut it off. It is then yellow and dry. If not, let it remain.

orchid phaleanopsis

Orchid phaleanopsis Photo:©nini.tjader.2017

I love orchids. But I only have one kind, the phaleanopsis in various colors. Maybe I will get some new color and/or new kind one day, but presently six (6) orchids are enough.

orchid phaleanopsis

Orchid phaleanopisis Photo: ©nini.tjader.2017

Posted by nini in greenery, House plants, orchids, Plants, 0 comments

Creative Plant Pots

creative_plantpots

Creative plant pots? Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

Creative Plant Pots? That is the subject for the Urbanjunglebloggers task for November. Do I have any creative pots? Not really… Can creative plant pots be the way you use pots for your plants, or does it have to be the look of the pots themselves?

creative_plantpots

Creative plant pots? Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

If we talk about the use of the pots rather than the look of them, then I will show you mine. The above ones are from IKEA and called BITTERGURKA. You can hang them one under the other. I have two connected and could have three if I give up the space on the windowledge under it. (Just beware that the plants are not too heavy and that they initially hang on something that can take the weight of the connected pots).

The pots is for hanging plants. But, as I my orchids do not grow upwards but to the sides and downwards I came to the conclusion some time ago that they are better off placed in these hanging pots. And the three I’ve put there love it.

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Creative plant pots? Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

My other three orchids are to be moved into these glassvases in the near future. Presently they live in those semi-transparent boring plastic pots that all orchids are sold in. The two vases in front are from IKEA, the one in the back is a cheap find at the shop of the Salvation Army the other day. I will follow up with a post about how and how it looks when done with the re-planting.

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Creative plant pots? Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

Most of my plant pots are simple and white without any decorations whatsover. My idea of plant pots is that they should not be what you see first. First should be the plant itself. The pot should be as uninteresting as possible. The above one is somewhat an exception with its pattern of a hanging cloth. I have no idea where I got it from.

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Creative plant pots? Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

This (above) is what I like. White. Simple. No adornments…

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Creative Plant Pots? Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

This big, white, but lightweight, pot with its own plate I got from a neighbor when they moved north summer before last. They didn’t want to risk it when they moved. This kind of pot comes in several colors and sizes and some variations as well. It is usually sold at various fairs or at the ceramics shop where they are made. It comes from STUREHOFS KRUKMAKERI. I love it.

plantpots

Creative plant pots? Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

This one (above) is not very creative, I agree. It is where my large climbing plant in the kitchen lives. it covers one and a half window presently. The plant pot is from IKEA and is one of their very first self-watering plant pots. They don’t do them in black any more, only white. Today it is called FEJÖ. 

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Creative Plant Pots? Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

In the living room the pots do not get any more creative than in the kitchen… But, you can add things around them that makes the arrangment more creative.

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Creative Plant Pots Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

The plant in the middle for instance has a stand under its simple white pot that is not as simple as the pot. I found that stand in the garbage where I previously lived and have used it ever since.

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Creative Plant Pots Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

In my livingroom window and the sideboard there I put various decorative items in between the plant pots to make it more interesting to look at. The glass candle holder above is from IKEA.

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Creative Plant Pots? Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

Otherwise, my plant pots in the livingroom are white and simple… The one above for hanging plants comes from HORNBACH. it is smart as comes with metalwires to hang it up. Makes it strong to hold the plant in it. It also has a structured outside that I like.

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Creative Plant Pots? Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

Usually my plant pots do not get more interesting than this white one…

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Creative Plant Pots? Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

Or this dark blue one and the big white one with my largest cactus. The latter is from IKEA (not sold any more) and has an irregular shape in a triangular form. That is creative, right? I is perfect for the cactus as it is rather wide.

plantpots

Creative Plant Pots? Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

My smallest cactus – babies from the big one – has a flowershaped plant pot in green, Makes it stand out beside my white ones… I don’t know where I got it from. Have had it for years.

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Creative Plant Pots? Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

So, if the pot is white and simple, you can always decorate the plant itself with a metal colorful butterfly on a stick, right?

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Creative Plant Pots? Photo:©nini.tjader.2016

My olivetree also got a butterfly and a dedicated plantlight to survive the winter indoors. The plant pot is one of those I use most: simple and white with a plate just as simple and white. Can be bought in most stores that sell plant pots.

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Creative Plant Pots? Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

My plant pots do not get more creative than this. My plants have the lead role, not the pots they live in. I like them white and simple, but they may come in different shapes. Is that creative?

plantpots

Plant pots in the living room window. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

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Posted by nini in greenery, House plants, plantpots, Plants, Urban Jungle Bloggers, 2 comments

Kitchenplants in November

kitchenplants

My kitchenplants in November 2017. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

The kitchenplants in my kitchenwindows look their best in the morning, provided the sun is shining. This time of the year is usually dark and gloomy with very little daylight. So, when there IS som daylight I try to use it to shoot some pictures. In November the Xmas decorations etc are not up and around yet. They will be very soon. Those days when the sun shines – long in between – the light in the kitchen is beautiful in the mornings.

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My kitchenplants in November 2016. Photo:©nini.tjader.2016

I cannot get enough of that light.

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My kitchenplants in November 2016. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

The plants in the kitchenwindows vary over time. This is the situation just now. Some die, new ones are added, some move from these windows to other windows.

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My kitchenplants in November 2016. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

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Plants in my kitchenwindows in November 2016. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

I’ve got six (6) orchids. Three of them nowadays are placed in the plant-hangers, two in one of the windows, and one has moved onto the plantstand where I earlier had the muelenbeckia (now removed and in the trash). All six of the orchids will soon bloom. Flowerstems and buds are on their way.

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Kitchenlants November 2016. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

Before the orchids open their flowers I will have re-planted them, cleaned their roots and placed them in some new pots. (I’ve been collecting/assembling some nice glass vases for this purpose). All my orchids are growing horizontally and have huge bundles of roots, some alive, some not.

My ginkgo biloba above is losing leafs presently and some of those that have not fallen off are getting somewhat yellow. I guess that is normal? I don’t think it is supposed to be green the year around.

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Kitchenplants November 2016. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

The hanging plants – including three of the orchids – are those plants that look the best presently. Despite the normally grey and dark November-light. It is only this light when the sun is out and it is morning.

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Kitchenplants November 2016. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

I’ve restarted the above plant. Its stems got all naked and had leaves only at the end of them. So I simply reduced their lengths and put them into new soil. They get roots very fast and now look just fine.

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Kitchenplants November 2016. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

Its green relative has never looked better. I love it the way it looks just now.

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Kitchenplants, November 2016. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

Even this small plant is looking good. It even got “flowers”, lots of them.

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Kitchenplants, rosemary. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

One of my two rosemary plants – which both live outdoors during the warm season – is still having flowers. Both seem to be at good health indoors so far.

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Kitchenlants, white pelargonia November 2016. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

I only kept one of my pelargonias when it was time to move them indoor. Simply didn’t have space for all of them. The one I kept is the white one. I kept the smallest of them. It keeps on getting new flowers…

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Kitchenplants November 2016. Photo:©nini.tjader.2016

And this one… I divided it into two in the spring and they are both thriving and throwing out long arms with flowers and leaves. They’ve become really big.

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Kitchenplants in November, 2016. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

Oh, almost forgot about this one. A fragranced pelargonia. I’ve been waiting for it to grow roots for weeks. Now they come, at the darkest period of the year. If it survives the rest of the winter I’ll have one more pelargonia for next year.

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Kitchenplants in November 2016. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

The above picture of one of the kitchenwindows was shot last week when the snow was still there outside. All white and adding light. All the snow is gone by now. It has all melted.

I love that light in the kitchen in the mornings. So do my kitchenplants.

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Posted by nini in greenery, House plants, kitchen, Plants, 0 comments

Plant stands

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Plant stand in the kitchen. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

When your windowsills don’t have enough space for your plants, you need plant-stands to put your plants on. The one above is from Ikea and called Satsumas. I like it because it is airy and doesn’t take up too much space. It is placed in the corner between my two windows in the kitchen, where plants get good light from two directions without being in direct sun. Only negative with this plant-stand is that no platform can take more than 5 kgs. That resulted in some re-organizing of my plants. (Picture also reveals that I need to do something about my electric outlets on the floor and all the cables…).

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Plant stand in the bedroom. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

The above is the plant-stand I previously had in the kitchen, with the large aloe vera on it. It presently stands in the bedroom with a pot with fake flowers on it.

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Plant stand in the bedroom. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

In the bedroom in the background in the middle is a white plant-stand. I had it outside until just the other day and only took it inside recently and cleaned it. It will have a plant on it later on when a lot of plants move indoors in few weeks time. Autumn is approaching though it isn’t cold outside just yet. That one was a find just outside at the garbage-disposal at my previous flat. I’ve used it for various plants over the years ever since. Not really my type of item if we are talking style… I like simpler things. At least it is white.

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Plant stand/sideboard in the livingroom. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

In the livingroom I’ve enlarged the area for putting plants by adding a sideboard. Presently it mainly houses decorative items, but that will change soon enough when plants move indoors. The pot of the plant in the corner to the left stands on another pot to get it higher up. That’s a temporary solution.

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Plant stand. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

This (above) is more my kind of plant-stand when it comes to style. It is black, wired, plastic-coated stand. I bought that at a garden-shop yeas ago and have used it on and off. It was outside until today when I took it indoors and cleaned it. The funny thing is that now all kinds of plant-stands of this type start to appear. Lots of them.

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My plant stand outside on the patio. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

This is how it looked outside. The plant now got a terracotta plate under it and another stand.

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Lagerhaus plant stand, SEK 179. Image from Lagerhaus.se

The above one comes from Lagerhaus.se and costs SEK179. They also have it in a smaller version that costs SEK99. This is really useful. You can use it turned either way.

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Plantstand from Lagerhaus.se. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

The problem with some of these plantstands is their size. They are only done for smaller pots which limits their usefulness.

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Plantstand from Lagerhaus.se. Image from Lagerhaus.se.

Th prices for these ones varies wildly. The ones from Lagerhaus.se are the least expensive. There are others out there that are much more expensive.

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The NORM plant stand. Image from NORM.

This one is from NORM architects. What it costs? No idea. Who sells it? No idea. But it is goodlooking. Love it.

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Found on Pinterest. Image from Pinterest.

This one is nicelooking (found it on Pinterest), but it looks dangerous… Don’t come close or it will fall over?

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Plant stands from Nordic Living. Image from Nordic Living.

These ones are from NORDIC LIVING and costs around SEK 450.

There are many more out there. Either google for plant stands or look them up at Pinterest.

Of course you can also hang your plants from above. There are various solutions for that too, but that is for another time.

plant stands

Found on Pinterest. Image from Pinterest.

Posted by nini in decoration, greenery, House plants, Plants, Urban Jungle Bloggers, 2 comments

Some of the plants in the kitchen

plants, kitchenwindows

The plants in my kitchenwindows. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

This is some of the plants in the kitchen. I love having greenery around me. I have two windows in the kitchen. The one to the left is south-facing, the one to the right is west-facing. And then there is the plant-stand in the corner between them.

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Plantstand in the kitchen. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

The plant-stand is fairly new. It comes from ikea and is called SATSUMAS. I like it because it is airy and gives a light impression. Its inclusion in the kitchen though is one of the reasons that the large aloe vera that used to live there had to move elsewhere. It is simply too heavy. Each platform on this plant-stand can only take 5 kilos.

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Corokia Cotoneaster on the plant-stand. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

One of the plants on the plant-stand that got moved to the kitchen recently is my corokia cotoneaster, or zig-zag-plant as some call it.  After a couple of weeks there it seems to like its new place. It is very hard to take pictures of as the leaves are so small, many and spread. The pot it lives in is very light despite its size.

I got the pot from former neighbors Lars & Camilla when they moved north last summer. They thought it might get destroyed in the move. I also got four stephanotis, pots included, from them. Two I’ve kept, one I gave on to neighbor Gullis and one to friend Ulla in town.

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Ginkgo Biloba on the plant-stand. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

Also on the plant-stand is my ginkgo biloba, which has moved around a lot in the flat since I got it at a garden fair in the spring.  It has grown since I bought it and it too seems to like its new place in the kitchen.

slideranka, plättar_i_luften

Newest plant in the kitchen. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

The newest plant in the kitchen is the above one, which has only been in my kitchen a short time yet. I hope it will like it here. It is a muehlenbeckia complexa (in Swedish called slideranka or plättar-i-luften) or maidenhair vine or a lot of other names. Very trendy in interiors presently…

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Orchids in the kitchen window. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

Another change for the plants in the kitchen windows is that I’ve moved three of my orchids (I have six) into the hanging plant-containers (from IKEA) in the window. I took the opportunity to do that when the latest flowering had passed. Next time the flowers come the flowers will be allowed to hang out from the container. I will move down the one in the top container and up the one with green-white leaves. There is another one of those in the top one. I divided the original plant some time ago. Now both have flowers.

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Stephanotis floribunda in the kitchen window. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

In one of the kitchenwindows lives one of my stephanotis floribunda, a very common house plant. I have two. The other one hangs in the window in the livingroom. This one also used to be in the livingroom, but moved here when I moved the aloe vera to the livingroom. Funny thing is, it totally changed its form when it got its place in the kitchen windows. It now gets light from two directions which causes its leaves to turn in new directions. I like it.

plants, houseplants, kitchen

Plants in the kitchen. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

I keep moving plants around depending on the season. When the cold season comes (October?) some of my outside plants will move inside. That will totally change the situation and fill all available space with plants from out on the patio.

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Plants in one of the kitchen windows. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

This is the south-facing window. This orchid is the last still blooming. It grows in a crazy way… Will have to do something about that when it stops blooming.

The large plant surrounding the window, a philodendron I’ve had for almost two decades, is now reaching the second window as well. It replaces curtains and is hanging on the curtain rods. The green-and-white-striped hanging plant is one of those tiny plants Ikea sells that has become large and got a larger hanging pot of its own. What it is called? I have no idea.

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Plant in the kitchenwindow. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

I hang the hanging pots on the curtain rods as I do not use curtains in the kitchen. Blinds are needed though during summer for protection of the plants from the sun when it shines.

I’ve always had lots of plants in the kitchen. They change over time and with the seasons, but always lots of plants. Who needs curtains in the kitchen when you have plants?

plants, houseplants, kitchenwindow

Plants in the kitchen. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

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Posted by nini in greenery, House plants, kitchen, Plants, Urban Jungle Bloggers, 0 comments

The story of my figtree

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A leaf of my figtree, February 2016 Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

The story of my figtree is the following: I bought it last year, late spring. It lived outside on the patio the entire summer of 2015 until it got too cold for it to be outside. It then moved indoors and lived in my livingroom window over winter, with the help of artificial light for plants, but normal temperatures for indoors (approximately +23°C). The window is turned to the west and has afternoon sun.

The figtree got four (4) figs while indoors. Three you could eat, one was no good, the others were… so,so. It didn’t loose a single leaf over winter though I was prepared that it might.

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My figtree, indoors, March 19th, 2016 Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

By the beginning of May it was time to move the figtree outside again as the outside temperatures became comfortable for both plants and humans. The figtree is supposed to manage even if temperature drops slightly below zero centigrades.

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Figtree outside on May 6th, 2016 Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

It again got figs. Two this time. Lost a few leaves, but not many.

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Figtreeleaf on May 10th 2016. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

What it didn’t like though was the strong sun. Some leaves got sunburnt and later fell off. I should have known to protect it better from the sun…

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Figtree on July 19th 2016. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

By the middle of July I thought it looked poorly and partly naked. Remaining leaves were a bit discolored and it didn’t want to grow at all. Some of its roots were crawling on top of the earth in the pot.

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Figtree on July 26th, 2016. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

So the figtree got a larger pot and new soil and some nourishing watering. That made it come alive and finally start to grow again. It also probably helped that the weather was fine and extraordinarily sunny and warm.

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New figtree leaves July 26th 2016. Photo. ©nini.tjader.2016

New leaves finally started to appear and grow fast.

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Figtree on July 27th 2016. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

There were signs of life at other places on the tree as well.

On August 6th it looked like this. (Click on an image to see a larger version).

To my relief the positive development just continued. By August 14th it looked like this. (Click on an image to see a larger version).

The progress and growth is fast now. It also seems to like the recent rains. Below is how my figtree looked this morning. I am happy that it is now growing.

Question is: where do I put it when it has to move inside again? It is too big by now to be put in a window…

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My figtree on August 19th 2016. Photo: ©nini.tjader.2016

Posted by nini in greenery, House plants, Plants, Urban Jungle Bloggers, 0 comments